How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

Have you ever wondered how to see the world, the people with impaired color perception? Fortunately, the Internet has been a resource color-blindness.com that allows you to imagine how it feels wrong to see colors or not see them at all. Despite the name, color blindness, or color blindness does not imply automatically that the person sees the world in black and white. In fact, more than 99% of all people with color blindness can see colors. That is why the term "color vision deficiency" is more correct.

According color-blindness.com about 0.5% of women (one of 200) and 8% of men (one in 12) suffer from color vision deficiency in one form or another. There are several options of color vision deficiency, including deuteranomaly where everything looks a bit faded, Protanopia, in which all seems a bit greenish, and tritanopia, in which everything is seen in a greenish-pink. And only about 0,00003% of the population suffers from monochromatism, that is true color blindness when everything is black and white.

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind Source: Buzzfeed

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

Look like a different color for a person with normal vision.

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

The most common type of color vision deficiency is deuteranomaly. About 4.63% of males and 0.36% of females suffer this form of the disorder, and many of them do not even know it. People with deuteranomaly see more faded color palette, especially shades of green.

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

When a person has Protanopia (blindness to red), all shades of green and red look rather dull and yellow and blue and almost no distortion. This type of color vision deficiency affects about 1% of men.

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

People with tritanopia see the world in green or pink from the lack of retina pigment responsible for detection of blue color. This is a very rare form of color blindness, which affects only 0,0001% of men and women.

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

Absolute color blindness, or monochromatism is the rarest form of color blindness. Such people see everything in black and white, but it is believed that only 0,00003% of the world population are affected.

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

 

How the world looks through the eyes of a colorblind

Keywords: Sight | Disturbance | Colors | Feelings

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