Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Categories: Culture

Russian russians swear that there is almost nothing left in the Russian language - some borrowings that came to us from other countries! It is understandable: simple, "unfashionable" Russian words are often replaced by "overseas" exclusively for marketing purposes. For example, the dorm has long been a coliving, and the rent is a sharing. It sounds more solid and more expensive.

But it turns out that English (and not only) also has enough words that were borrowed from our great and mighty. Why and who needed babushka, vodka and balalaika, read in the material.

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

For the first time, Russian words penetrated into English back in the XIV century, when the British bought sable fur in Russia. Russian russians didn't have a name for this Russian beast, so they decided to borrow it from the Russian language. So the word "sable" soon appeared in the English dictionary.

Later, when warmer economic and political relations were established between the countries, the second wave of borrowing began. Soon the words "tsar" (tsar), "muzhik" (muzhik), "copeck" (kopeck) and others came into use by the British.

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Russian Russian Grammar was even published in England in the XVII century, which described the meanings and correct pronunciation of borrowed Russian words. By that time, the locals already knew perfectly well what samovar, telega, shchi and beluga were. As interest in Russian speech grew, more "specific" words began to penetrate into the English language, for example: barshina, troka, obrok. Or even such as "siberite" - a kind of ruby mined in the Urals, and "uralite" - a type of slate.

In the XVIII-XIX century, against the background of recent political events, the "Russian-language dictionary" of the English was replenished with the terms "narodnik", "Decembrist", "nihilism", "ispravnik" and "ispravnik". And every year the number of words that came to English from Russian only grew and grew.

As you have already understood, most Russian words in English are archaisms and historicisms, or just words that are pronounced quite rarely. However, there are also many common ones used by native English speakers almost every day. One of the most popular is, of course, vodka. It would even be strange to talk about Russia and not mention this alcoholic drink.

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

The second most popular Russian word is babushka. And recently, a style of clothing called babushka boi even appeared in the USA. Moreover, local rappers became the "pioneers" in fashion…

Among other Russianisms in English:

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Coulibiac - coulibiac

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Borzoi - a breed of greyhound dogs

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Kalashnikov - Kalashnikov assault rifle

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Pirozhki - pies

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Taiga - taiga

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

Balalaika - balalaika

It turns out that some Russian words were "borrowed" from us by Turks, Germans, Latvians and even the French! For example, our delicious word "shish kebab" has "migrated" to German (as well as to English). And Latvians and Balts, in addition to often using a strong Russian mat, also like to shout "Davai!".

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

An interesting story happened with the word "hat" in general. Initially, it originated from the French "chapeau", but then they began to use the word "chapka" and denote exclusively a hat with earflaps.

Babushka, vodka, balalaika and other Russian borrowings in foreign languages

In addition, the French liked the word "malossol", as well as the pickles themselves. But later they also began to call caviar.

Well, let's remember sable again. Since this animal lives mainly only in Russia, its name has penetrated from us into many other languages. For example, in Germany it is called "zobel", and in Finland - "soopeli".

Recent articles

"Let's drink vodka with Putin and have a laugh": American Heron Preston presented a T-shirt with the Russian president for 38 thousand rubles
"Let's drink vodka with Putin and have a laugh": American ...

Designer Heron Preston, who was friends and worked with rapper Kanye West, presented a collaboration with the Moscow store ...

Recipes for burgers, KFC chicken and other fast food that you can cook at home no worse
Recipes for burgers, KFC chicken and other fast food that you ...

Three eternal questions torment humanity. Are we alone in the universe? What is the meaning of life? And why is McDonald's so ...

"Spring is coming, make way for spring!": student drunken parties in the USA
"Spring is coming, make way for spring!": student drunken ...

In March, a real bacchanal begins in Florida: thousands of students come here from all over the country to have a good time. This ...