5 features of a Japanese home interior that make it the most comfortable place to live

5 features of a Japanese home interior that make it the most comfortable place to live

Categories: Art | Asia | Design and Architecture | Lifestyle | People | Photo project | Society | Tradition | World

Traditional Japanese homes can seem strange to Westerners due to their minimalist design, simplicity, and economy. There is nothing superfluous in them. Each object has its own place, and all functions have great symbolic meaning.

We'll walk you through the key concepts and features that make traditional Japanese homes so unique.

5 PHOTOS

5 features of a Japanese home interior that make it the most comfortable place to live

1. Abundance of empty space.

The Japanese don't like to clutter their homes with furniture and little knickknacks.

5 features of a Japanese home interior that make it the most comfortable place to live

2. Versatility.

A traditional Japanese home has no walls, at least not in the conventional sense. Instead, the Japanese use fusuma, lightweight sliding panels that act as doors and walls.

But the bathroom and toilet are located in different rooms, and the bathroom can occupy 2 rooms. One room has a sink and shower, the other has a traditional Japanese bath. We are talking about how much importance they attach to baths: the dirt must be washed off in the shower, and in the bath, they prefer to relax in hot water.

5 features of a Japanese home interior that make it the most comfortable place to live

3. In harmony with nature.

A common attribute of a Japanese home is a garden. You can often get into it right from home. All that is required is to open the sliding panel, otherwise known as shoji. When the weather is fine, shoji is always open. Closeness to nature is achieved through the use of natural materials.

5 features of a Japanese home interior that make it the most comfortable place to live

4. Plenty of sun rays.

Another inherent feature of a Japanese home's interior is the abundance of dim lighting that shines through the outer walls. They are made of a translucent material that diffuses light through the grille frame. A similar effect is created with bamboo or rice paper lamps.

5 features of a Japanese home interior that make it the most comfortable place to live

5. Minimalism.

The most important thing in any Japanese house is not the external beauty of things, but the comfort and tranquility of its owners. There are no vibrant, vibrant colors or many decorations that are often found in Western homes. They only use furniture that is essential for their daily life.

Keywords: Japanese | Comfortable | Interior design | Symbolic functions | Place | House | Home | Flat | Archutecture | Design | Minimalis | Japan | Asia

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