Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

Categories: Children | History

On the night of November 10, 1938, thousands of synagogues and Jewish businesses throughout Nazi Germany and parts of Austria were burned or destroyed. This tragic event is known in history as Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Shop Windows. At least 91 Jews died, and tens of thousands were taken prisoner to go to concentration camps later. This event was the beginning of one of the most terrible genocides in world history — the Holocaust.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

In response to the actions of the Nazis, British Jews and Quakers filed an emergency appeal to Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain with a request for permission to temporarily import Jewish children into the country without parents and other accompanying persons.

The bill was adopted as a matter of urgency. Within a few days, representatives of the British community were sent to Germany and Austria to arrange safe passage for Jewish children at risk of persecution. In the media, the rescue operation was dubbed "Kindertransport".

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

January 11, 1939. The mentor at the Dovercourt refugee camp rings the bell to announce the start of lunch.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 2, 1938. The first refugees in England.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 2, 1938. German-born Jewish woman Helga Samuel arrives in Harwich.

On November 25, British citizens heard on BBC radio a call from Herbert Samuel to temporarily take care of Jewish children. Soon, about 500 offers were received, and RCM volunteers began visiting potential foster homes and compiling reports on living conditions.

Three weeks after Kristallnacht, the first group of 196 Jewish children, mostly from burned-down shelters in Berlin, arrived in the UK. In the next 9 months, before the outbreak of World War II in September 1939, almost 10,000 children from 3 to 17 years old, left without parents or guardians, from Germany, Austria, Poland and Czechoslovakia were transported to the United Kingdom.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 2, 1938. A Kindertransport agent meets refugees.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

1939. Temporary documents for Kindertransport refugees.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 2, 1938.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 2, 1938. 8-year-old refugee Josefa Salmon in Harwich.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 2, 1938. Max Unger arrives at a refugee camp.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 17, 1938. A Jewish boy is learning English.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 17, 1938. A Jewish boy during a long-awaited vacation at the Dovercourt camp.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 1938. A Jew of German origin.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 1938. The refugees have arrived in places of temporary residence.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 1938. The first lunch of refugees at the Dovercourt coastal camp.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

January 14, 1939. Two Eton schoolchildren give vocal lessons to refugees at the Dovercourt camp.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 17, 1938. A refugee boy plays football.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

January 11, 1939. Miss Herford on a walk with refugee children.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 1938. Duty officers during lunch at the Dovercourt camp.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 1938. A Jewish boy rings the bell to announce the start of lunch.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 1938. Lunch at the Dovercourt recreation camp.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 17, 1938. Dovercourt camp.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 17, 1938. A refugee in Dovercourt.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

December 1939. Refugees rest after arriving at Dovercourt camp.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

March 24, 1939. These four guys and 250 other refugees arrived in Southampton on the Manhattan liner.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

January 1939. 11-year-old Otto Busch together with his foster family — Mr. and Mrs. Guest.

The children were placed in foster homes, which they had to leave after the end of the war to return home. Many of them never saw their relatives again.

Among the children rescued during Operation Kindertransport were future Nobel laureates: astrophysicist Arno Penzias, physicist Walter Cohn — and many others who, despite having lost their home and family, became an outstanding politician, scientist or artist.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

February 16, 1939. Refugees play at the Dane Court Farm, which Sir Edmund Davis has turned into a temporary shelter.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

1939. Jewish refugees at Harris House, Lancashire. The house was closed in 1940 because the British authorities feared a security threat to Jews over the age of 16.

Rare pictures of the British special operation to save children during the Holocaust

March 24, 1939. Refugees arrive in England on the American ocean liner Manhattan.

Keywords: Refugees | World War II | The Holocaust

Recent articles

The last man of the XIX century Emma Morano and her secret
The last man of the XIX century Emma Morano and her secret

On November 29, Emma Morano from Vercelli, Italy, celebrated her 117th birthday. Emma is officially the oldest person alive on ...

Corpse farms: for whom a terrible "harvest" is ripening in the fields and forests
Corpse farms: for whom a terrible "harvest" is ripening in ...

As sad as it sounds, but after death, most likely, you will no longer need your body. But scientists may well find it useful. If ...

10 rules of table etiquette of different countries that should not be violated
10 rules of table etiquette of different countries that ...

In any cultural society, it is necessary to adhere to etiquette. Therefore, during a trip to another country, it is necessary, ...

Related articles

Photo project: the migrant crisis in Europe through the eyes of migrants themselves
Photo project: the migrant crisis in Europe through the eyes ...

This poignant photo project is an attempt to tell about the migrant crisis in Europe through their own eyes. There is no shortage ...

Refugee homes: survival instead of life
Refugee homes: survival instead of life

According to the UN, today more than 65 million people have the status of forced migrants. These are people who have been left with ...

Historical photos take on a new meaning if you add superheroes to them
Historical photos take on a new meaning if you add ...

Indonesian photographer and illustrator Agap Arahap is fond of military history and superhero films. Combining his two hobbies, he ...