How Marketers Fool Consumers

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Categories: Society | Technology

On Habrhabra, a portal for IT specialists, a cry of soul and despair, an opinion about the wonderful science of marketing, was published.

Mosigra writes: "For what exactly do I hate some individual marketers, or How an IT specialist went shopping. In general, we took a little walk around the shops in debugging mode."

How Marketers Fool Consumers

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Meet me, this is an ordinary liter bag of milk.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

The second patient.

Warning

I must say right away that I do not sell any of these products, I have nothing to do with him or his competitors. I chose products from the similar class only because they were closer and more accessible on the shelf. Well, or they attracted my attention more than the neighbors. On specific brands and articles, the light did not converge like a wedge — there are a lot of analogues. All judgments, in particular regarding specific products and brands, are evaluative, I can mess up because of ignorance of the material part. If I'm wrong, please correct me. Below we will talk about my personal feelings and emotions. That's it, let's go.

"Now without asbestos"

The product may indicate something extremely obvious that competitors forgot to write. Here is a cholesterol-free oil that exploits the biological illiteracy of the buyer:

How Marketers Fool Consumers

And without nuclear waste. It's strange that it's not listed on the label.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Nice try.

You can disguise yourself as a well-known class of goods. For example, there is margarine, and there is butter. It is enough to arrange margarine as butter and not write the word "butter" or the word "margarine" on it. Oppa, what is this we have?

How Marketers Fool Consumers

First, evaluate the coloring. Just poured oil, right? Secondly, pay attention to the name — you will guess it only on the third attempt (it is on the price tag). The gender of the name is very important. Thirdly, the price tag itself. Relatively recently, standards have changed, and the price tag was forced to indicate the type of product — in this case, it is not oil, but spread. But the law obliging to keep butter and margarine on different shelves somehow did not work out.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Confectionery tile without adding cocoa in the shelf with chocolate on the left and right.

Let's move on to dexterous movements with components.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Caviar.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

"Without preservatives" — but citric acid in the composition.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

I've always been insanely interested in who these young bulls are at such a price. Well, I found out.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

It seems that "based on" is "directly natural from them".

And here are the good old crab sticks. And even though they are not made of crab (which everyone seems to already know about), the manufacturer still honestly warns on the packaging that they are made of fish:

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Just an established name.

Now let's go buy some water. If you get into the classification, it turns out that we are primarily interested in the word "dining room" defined by the standard — this is such water that can be consumed by a healthy person every day without restrictions. Please note, it is different from drinking. Drinking water can be drunk, and the dining room is a subset of drinking water, such a drinking water that you can drink every day, and you won't get anything for it. Well, there is also a "medical canteen", which you can drink almost as often, if you don't fan out.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Canteen. They write from behind.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Another dining room. They also write from behind without extra show-offs (well, considering the price— it's quite understandable).

How Marketers Fool Consumers

It's also good, but it's not worth living on it alone for a year in a row.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

And this is the talent of a marketer. The word "real" is not described in the standard, but it sounds cool.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Baby water? What is it? Is there any training water?

No examples could be found during this crawl. I remember that I came across beer with GOST for water purification on the label plus sweets, where it was written in large letters "Natural products" on the front side. On the reverse it turned out that it was LLC "Natural products".

We read under the asterisk

A girl drags me into cosmetics to show something:

How Marketers Fool Consumers

It is correct to read like this: "(Deep nutrition) and (hydration)". The humidification is very shallow. So, only the surface of the skin. But there are no programmers among the target audience.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

But I didn't even think about that. Let's do it again: they promise me a noticeable result in two weeks. How did they check? We washed our hair with this thing and - attention, focus - with another other thing. And these two things together had a noticeable result. Almost perfect logic.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Almost the same logic.

Here is a perfect example of aggressive exploitation of laziness. Packaged expensive carrots on top, but if you flip 5-6 packages, you can see the usual one. I knew what to look for because I needed a couple of carrots, not a pack at once.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

As long as they don't bury the loose carrots, I'm only for the packaged ones.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Colonel Sanders died in 1980. UPD: in the comments, forgotten suggests that he served as a private for 3 months.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

Photo of the terminal offer, I drew an arrow to draw attention to one of the points. Have you replenished your balance? Catch the ads.

Three times I bought a product more expensive, because there was a price tag under it from another cheaper one. The most striking example is to "mix up" the price tags for a large jar of green peas and a small one. As part of the campaign, an example could not be found.

But here's a cooler option for you.

Fast feeding point

Look at the picture:

How Marketers Fool Consumers

See the catch? Here's a pancake, there's a pie… Everything's fine, right? But there is one caveat. Strain your eyes.

How Marketers Fool Consumers

That's about why I hate some marketers for such different things.

Keywords: Shop | Marketing | Buyers

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