American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Categories: Health and Medicine

In the 1950s, the American government conducted many experiments to study psychotomimetic drugs. The essence of one of these experiments is to give a person a strictly dosed amount of LSD and then observe the behavior of the object.

Oscar Janiger, a psychiatrist from the University of California, Irvine, known for his research on the effects of LSD, gave the experimental artist a box with crayons, pencils and pens, and asked him to paint a portrait of the doctor who injected him under the influence of the drug.

Using the example of nine paintings, it can be seen that the drug begins to act quickly and the artist's perception changes along with the drawings.

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 20 minutes after the first dose (50 micrograms).

The patient decides to draw with charcoal. The substance has not yet taken effect, according to the object.

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 85 minutes after the first dose and 20 minutes after the second.

The patient seems to be in a state of euphoria. "I see everything so clearly now. It's... you... all of it… I can't control the pencil. It feels like he wants to move on himself."

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 2 hours 30 minutes after the first dose.

The patient completely concentrated on drawing. "The contours seem normal, but the rest is so bright, it changes color. My hand should follow the bold movements of the lines. It feels like my consciousness is entirely concentrated in the parts of the body that are moving—the arm, the elbow... the tongue."

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 2 hours 32 minutes after the first dose.

The patient became interested in the notebook. "I want to try to draw in a different way. The model looks fine, but my drawing doesn't. My hand is changing too. The portrait didn't turn out very well, did it? I'll try again."

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 2 hours 35 minutes after the first dose.

The patient quickly begins to draw another portrait. "I will draw it in the form of a flower... without interrupting the line." When the drawing is ready, the patient starts laughing until he is distracted by something on the floor.

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 2 hours 45 minutes after the first dose.

The patient is trying to get into a box with pencils, he seems very excited. He reacts slowly to the suggestion to draw something else. "I... everything... has changed... they call... your face... is mixed up... who..." The patient hums almost soundlessly.

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 4 hours 25 minutes after the first dose.

The patient returns to the bed, lies for 2 hours and waves his hands in the air. Suddenly he returns to the box, selects a pen and a watercolor. "It will be the best drawing, almost like the first one, only better. If I'm not careful, I'll lose control of my movements, but I won't, because I know. I know," repeats the last phrase many times. The patient puts the finishing touches to the drawing by running around the room.

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 5 hours 45 minutes.

The patient continues to move around the room along a rather complex trajectory. It takes an hour and a half before he calms down and sits down to draw again. It seems that the effect of the substance is passing. "I'm starting to feel my knees again. I think the substance stops working. The drawing turned out to be quite good, however, it is difficult to hold a pencil" (in the hands of a pastel chalk).

American experiment of the 50s: an artist who took LSD painted 9 portraits

Time: 8 hours after the first dose.

The patient is sitting on the bed. He says that the intoxication has passed, except that our faces are still a little distorted. We ask him to make the last drawing, which he does without enthusiasm. "I can't say anything about the latter. He is unsuccessful and uninteresting. I want to go home."

Keywords: 1950s | 50s | Psychiatry | Artist | Experiment

Recent articles

How the Classic Rider-Waite Tarot Deck was Born — The Story of Pamela "Pixie" Coleman-Smith
How the Classic Rider-Waite Tarot Deck was Born — The Story ...

Anyone who is seriously interested in esotericism is probably familiar with the Rider-Waite Tarot deck. To date, it is the most ...

The story of 14-year-old George Stinney, who was executed by mistake
The story of 14-year-old George Stinney, who was executed by ...

The history of world justice is full of annoying mistakes. Unfortunately, the price of these misunderstandings is usually very high ...

Why in the Middle Ages the church called the fork a "diabolical invention"
Why in the Middle Ages the church called the fork a ...

An ordinary dining fork has an impressive history with many interesting facts. It seems to us that these devices have always been ...

Related articles

X-ray, plumb and weights: how to choose "Miss correct posture" in the 50s
X-ray, plumb and weights: how to choose "Miss correct ...

What are the only beauty pageants were not conducted in the US in the last century! Every small brand, made it though the sausage, ...

Torture and other terrible methods of treating mental disorders
Torture and other terrible methods of treating mental disorders

Until the end of the XVIII century, people with mental illnesses were considered not sick, but possessed by the devil, or witches ...

Who are all these people? How is life for a girl with 12 different personalities inside her
Who are all these people? How is life for a girl with 12 ...

Many girls keep a diary. Most often, just to throw out those thoughts and emotions that cannot be shared with others. And ...